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Making Music with the NXT

This sample, taken from a teacher guide, makes use of Lego NXT programmable kits to create musical instruments. Controllable devices are built that can ‘play’ percussion instruments such as a xylophone and a drum; other ideas include making a trumpet using NXT touch sensors for buttons, or controlling tone using...

Dijkstra's Algorithm

Dijkstra's algorithm finds the shortest path for a given problem. Dijkstra's algorithm can be used to find the shortest route between two cities. This algorithm is so powerful that it not only finds the shortest path from a chosen source to a given destination, it also finds all of the shortest paths from the...

Datalogging Activities for the Busy Teacher

This sample of a teacher guide shows how the Lego NXT programmable brick can be used with compatible sensors as a versatile data logging kit. It contains examples of data logging in the wider world to help students engage with the topic, and guidance for simple investigative activities that link to science,...

Community STEM Clubs poster

STEM Clubs are not just for schools! They are a powerful and enjoyable way to engage young people with science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

This poster is for anyone wishing to advertise a STEM Club in their local communities, be it a one-off session or recurring club; in a library or...

Born to Engineer - Andrew Robertson

Andrew Robertson is a computer engineer working at Queen Mary, University of London on music signal processing. 

He has engineered a software package that allows bands to drive the tempo of their music to the response of the crowd and still keep their layered backing tracks in time with the beat. This film...

Your career in cancer research

This booklet provides useful information on a variety of routes into a career in cancer research including the fields of mathematics, computer science, chemistry, biochemistry, physics, medicine and non-research roles.

Pseudocode Challenge

This activity, created by Pete Dring and originally published here, contains a resource which is accessed via the web browser (although it is just on the local machine). The web page once loaded contains 20 interactive ...

Data Representation

The first video explains why computers use binary to store data.  The difference between a bit, nibble, byte, kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte, terabyte and petabyte is explained.  These are known as measurements of capacity, or how much data can be stored either in memory or on secondary storage devices.

The...

Translators and Facilities of Languages

The first video takes a brief look at the history of programming.  It examines the differences between low level languages such as Assembly, and high level languages such as Python.  It considers the uses of each of these different types of languages.

The second video we explain the purpose of translators...

Computational Logic

The first video explains why data is represented in binary using examples of RAM, a hard disk, optical disks and solid state memory.

The second video illustrates simple circuits built using components to create AND, OR and NOT logic gates.  GCSE students need to be able to combine gates to create more...

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