Genomics

Whilst this list provides a source of information and ideas for experimental work, it is important to note that recommendations can date very quickly. Do NOT follow suggestions which conflict with current advice from CLEAPSS, SSERC or recent safety guides. eLibrary users are responsible for ensuring that any activity, including practical work, which they carry out is consistent with current regulations related to Health and Safety and that they carry an appropriate risk assessment. Further information is provided in our Health and Safety guidance.

Links and Resources

Genome Games

At the beginning of this resource there is a glossary which would be very useful to give to students as a revision aide.

There are also some games which would make a good plenary activity.

At the end is a selection of news headlines with a missing word - great to have on the board when students enter the room.

publication year
2000 - 2009

1 file

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Genome Generation

This resource, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, helps students to debate current issues in genetics and genomics. The activity consists of eight real life different scenarios, with a story card which explains the scenario, information cards that provide additional facts and statistics relating to the topic area, issue cards and a selection of questions to see the issue from different perspectives. They analyse data, challenge their own ideas and consider how genomics will transform healthcare and influence our lives in the future.

publication year
2010 to date

12 files

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Zoom in on Your Genome

This animation can be downloaded and used on stand-alone computers.

The structure of DNA is quite difficult to put into context. Anything in biology at this scale is quite an abstract idea.

This animation helps students to focus down from the scale of the whole organism, through cell structure, into the nucleus and via chromosomes to the structure of DNA.

Making the animation available on the school network allows students to revisit it whenever they need to remind themselves of the scale, location and structure of DNA.

Note the way that chromosomes are represented. This is as single chromosomes arranged as matching pairs. This is an excellent representation. A lot of pictures will show chromosomes in a classic ‘X’ shape. This representation is misleading. They are chromatids formed during mitosis. These are an original chromosome and its replicated copy joined at the centromere.

publication year
2010 to date

4 files

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Debate kit - big data

This debating kit is designed to facilitate a structured debate about whether we should sequence the genomes of a million people in order to find out more about living longer and healthier.

The different ‘rounds’ of the debate help students think through the issues and reconsider their opinions. The structure also shows them how to build a discussion and back up their opinions with facts. Included in the kit are eight debate cards outlining the opinions of a number of different fictional characters which encourage students to think about the potential impact of genomics on health, and the practical and ethical issues it raises.

publication year
2010 to date

1 file

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Genomics

This booklet explores how understanding genomics may offer potential benefits to society, but also looks at how we might use and regulate that knowledge.

The resource describes the possible applications of synthetic biology. The emerging personal genomics industry is discussed and how restrictive regulation can hamper innovation in areas like biofuel production.

Finally, a series of thought provoking questions are suggested which can be used with students.

publication year
2010 to date

1 file

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Model Organisms: Zebra Fish

The presentation provides an introduction to model organisms outlining what they are and why they are used in genome research.  It also explains the advantages of using zebrafish as a model organism and how they are being used to research human diseases.

Students are then given a worksheet with accompanying flash cards. Each card shows an image of a wild type zebrafish and a similar mutant zebrafish. Some images are focused in on a specific part of the body, e.g. a muscle block or fin. Students use their observational skills to identify and record the difference (phenotypic  change) between the two images.

To aid in their diagnosis of the phenotypic change a glossary is provided to gives hints and clues as well as definitions for specific scientific terms.

publication year
2010 to date

5 files

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