Teach Food Technology: Teachers TV

The Teachers TV videos in this collection are those which have been suggested as part of the pre-course learning for the Food Technology in the Curriculum training course – part of the Teach Food technology national programme.

The films look at how schools have linked food technology at Key Stage Three with the wider government agenda about healthier eating and healthy schools.

It was suggested that teachers view the films in preparation for the course in order to consider their personal views on what is important in food technology education and for inspiration when planning their curriculum.

Resources

Learning to Cook at Oathall Community College

In this Teachers TV video, Oathall Community College shows how it uses cross-curriculum teaching to teach students about local produce and cooking.

The school has a farm on the premises run by Howard Wood, Rural Dimension Manager, who wants to make the students aware of the direct link between growing...

Down on the Farm

Produced by Teachers TV, this video helps to illustrate how animals live, where food comes from and the workings of a farm as children are followed during a residential visit to a farm.

Children and teachers from Kelvin Grove Primary School in South London spend a gruelling week at Nethercott Farm in...

Learning to Cook at Shenfield High

In this Teachers TV video, food technology teacher Chris Willingale thinks that learning to cook is essential, encouraging her students to experiment with flavours and enjoy cooking.

In Year Seven, the students take the opportunity to try out different flavours and ingredients for pizzas, whilst Year...

Tackling Obesity

With childhood obesity rising, this programme from Teachers TV looks at how schools can tackle the issues surrounding the problem.

Addressing whether schools should help to identify children at risk of obesity, the programme looks at the results of a new law in Arkansas, which allows the state's schools to...

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