Flipped learning: research report

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This small-scale qualitative study was published in 2015 and undertaken by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) and NESTA.  It set out to explore how flipped learning can be delivered in UK classrooms, what effect a flipped learning approach has on teaching and learning in mathematics, and to provide illustrative examples of the benefits and challenges of different approaches to flipped learning.

Flipped learning involves the use of digital technology, such as video, to provide direct instruction on new concepts outside of the classroom. Students come to lessons already having a preliminary understanding of the topic, freeing up class time for the teacher to focus on other beneficial learning activities

This small-scale qualitative study was published in 2015 and undertaken by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) and NESTA, set out to explore how flipped learning can be delivered in UK classrooms, what effect a flipped learning approach has on teaching and learning in mathematics, and to provide illustrative examples of the benefits and challenges of different approaches to flipped learning.

The study took place in the academic year 2014-15 in nine case-study schools (three secondary schools and one middle school in England, and five high schools in Scotland). A flipped learning approach was piloted with a key stage 3/secondary 1-3 class in each school with a topic of mathematics work lasting around half a school term (4-6 weeks). A comparable class of the same age group was taught mathematics using a traditional approach to provide a basis for comparison.

Teachers were asked to use Khan Academy mathematics resources in their delivery of flipped learning. They were provided with a guide to implementing the approach and documents which mapped the Khan Academy resources to the relevant curricula. The Khan Academy website provides instructional mathematics videos, exercises and reporting functions on students’ performance. In practise, some schools used alternative digital resources which they decided were more appropriate for their students.

Teachers and students provided their reflections on their experiences in interviews, focus groups and via questionnaires. Researchers also undertook lesson observations of both flipped learning classes and lessons taught using more traditional approaches.

The full collection of STEM Learning impact and evaluation research reports can be viewed here.

 

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