Computational Logic

The first video explains why data is represented in binary using examples of RAM, a hard disk, optical disks and solid state memory.

The second video illustrates simple circuits built using components to create AND, OR and NOT logic gates.  GCSE students need to be able to combine gates to create more complex circuits to two levels.

The third video illustrates how the different permutations of zeros and ones applied to logic gates and their output can be recorded in what is known as a “truth table”.

The fourth video explains exponentiation, modulus and integer division.  Used in programming and evaluated by the arithmetic logic unit in a CPU, these operators extend the multiplication and division capabilities of a computer.

Resources:

https://student.craigndave.org/videos/ocr-gcse-slr2-4-why-data-is-represented-in-binary

https://student.craigndave.org/videos/ocr-gcse-slr2-4-simple-logic-diagrams

https://student.craigndave.org/videos/ocr-gcse-slr2-4-truth-tables

https://student.craigndave.org/videos/ocr-gcse-slr2-4-computing-related-mathematics

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This resource is part of Craig ’n’ Dave OCR GCSE Computer Science

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