Sound waves

These hand-picked resources support the teaching of waves and sound at KS3.  The resources describe engaging demonstrations, explain how to use equipement such as oscillioscopes and suggest teaching approaches.

 

Links and Resources

Wave Machine

Sound waves are longitudinal and this film shows how to make and demonstrate a transverse wave machine - but it’s just too good not to include here!

The word “machine” probably gives the wrong impression, this machine is built simply and cheaply from duct tape, kebab sticks and jelly babies. It’s a fantastic introduction to the whole topic of waves showing that, although the wave moves all the way along the machine, the particles (jelly babies in this case) just vibrate. The film provides full details about how to make the machine and I suspect that many teachers, having used it once, will encourage students to help them make it during the lesson.

Use it alongside the more usual slinky spring which demonstrates both transverse and longitudinal waves.  

publication year
2010 to date

1 file

19

5

Signal Generator

A very helpful film for teachers who want to demonstrate the properties of sound waves but aren’t yet that confident when using a signal generator.  This film will help teachers to feel much more relaxed about using this equipment and, having had a practise, using it with a class should be much more straightforward.

You’ll see how to demonstrate that changing the frequency changes the pitch of the sound and how changing the amplitude changes the volume.

For the more adventurous, connecting an oscilloscope can show the same relationships visually.

publication year
2010 to date

0 files

1

0

Oscilloscope

This film is included here because teachers who are keen to use a signal generator in their lessons to demonstrate sound waves (see the resource above) may also appreciate some support in setting up and using an oscilloscope

publication year
2010 to date

0 files

1

0

Noisy Coat Hangers

Start collecting wire coat hangers now! This is an experiment that has to be heard to be believed. Students and teachers alike will be amazed just how much louder sounds are when they travel to your ears via a solid rather than (gaseous) air.

 

Go on to ask students to use particle theory to explain the difference.  

Unusually, the instructions for this experiment are available in multiple languages. It would be great to use during a languages week, or maybe you’d like to bring science to a Spanish or French lesson?

publication year
2000 - 2009

4 files

0

0

Sound 11-14

There’s a lot of high quality information here along with plenty of detail about a good variety of activities from the Institute of Physics. It takes a little bit of time to understand how the resource is structured but it’s well worth the effort.

 

Each of the two main topics (Describing sound and Quantifying and using sound) contains three sections:

                Physics Narratives (PN)

                Teaching Approaches (TA)          

                Teaching and Learning Issues (TL)

Old hands may want to turn straight to the Teaching Approaches whilst those outside their specialist area are likely to appreciate the background information provided by the Physics Narratives and the key points to bring out when working with students given in the Teaching and Learning Issues.

Particularly recommended are

·         So 01 TA Section 1: introducing sources and Section 2: sounds meeting detectors

·         So 02 TA Section 1: pitch and frequency and Section 2: range and frequency

publication year
2010 to date

7 files

0

0

Straw Oboes

A fun (and noisy) activity that will really bring to life students studies on sound.  All you need is a straw and a pair of scissors.

The film clearly shows how to carry out the activity, but there are written instructions and tips on page 7 of the accompanying booklet.

publication year
2010 to date

2 files

0

0

Sound

There is a wealth of activities on the theme of sound on offer in this teacher booklet which will amply repay time spent looking through it. Although the booklet itself is dated, the contents aren’t and teachers are almost bound to find something they haven’t seen before.

Many will know of the “bell in a jar” demonstration where a ringing bell becomes inaudible as a vacuum pump removes the air from the jar.  This booklet offers a version that all students can try for themselves: a small jingle bell in a syringe which students can partly empty of air to form a partial vacuum.

publication year
1980 - 1989

1 file

0

0

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