Climate Change Teacher Conference

Monday 24 – Thursday 27 May 2021: 4pm – 6pm daily

The STEM Learning Climate Change Teacher Conference (CCTC) was a live-streamed event for Primary and Secondary educators. Organised by STEM Learning and supported by the Climate Change Educational Partnership, the conference aimed to support teaching of STEM subjects and enrichment activities using climate change as a context.

You can check our their sessions in the recordings below.

Monday 24 May

What is climate change, what’s causing it and evidence of climate change

Twilight Talk
As a guest speaker of ESA, we heard from Professor Andrew Shepherd, the leading expert in the areas of Earth observation, polar science and climate science. He presented research which focused on measuring changes of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, on understanding their interaction with the global climate system, and on establishing their contribution to global sea level rise.
 
 
Twilight Forum
A panel of experienced senior lecturers and teachers – Dr Verity Jones, Liz Southwell, Dr Sarah Whitehouse and Sam Williams – introduced us to exciting resources and case studies. They shared how schools have developed innovative approaches to climate change education, engaged and enabled pupil voice alongside the challenges of curriculum design.
 

 

Tuesday 25 May

Climate change models and predictions

Twilight Talk
Met Office experts – Megan Pearce, Scientific Consultant; Rachel Perks, Marine Scientist; James Pope, Climate Scientist – introduced us to the world of climate modelling and how it is used to make a range of global and regional climate projections. These models include weather variables, such as temperature and rainfall and in the context of sea level rise.
 
 
Twilight Forum
This presentation by Graham Stow, Head of Education at Primary Engineer, featured their STATWARS Climate Change Challenge.

STATWARS is a new, free project for both primary and secondary schools which is curriculum mapped, provides lesson plans and resources as well as opportunities to engage with data and climate professionals. Graham covered how the project enables pupils to create data-led decisions and actions to positively tackle climate change; best practice; how the project supports curriculum teaching and a careers-related learning experience.
 
 

Wednesday 26 May

Adapting and mitigating for climate change

Twilight Talk
The highly-respected expert, Alyssa Gilbert, Grantham Institute for Climate Change, presented key points on both adaptation (making changes to reduce the impact of climate change) and mitigation (reducing greenhouse gas emissions). Alyssa highlighted their meaning; the action which needs to be taken; the importance of COP26; the significance of student involvement and the huge part studying STEM subjects will play in achieving goals.
 
 
Twilight Forum
Leading researchers – Professor Lindsey McEwen, UWE, and Sally Stevens, Institute for Environmental Analytics, University of Reading - shared research and knowledge exchange from the UKRI Drought and Water Scarcity programme ‘Drought in the UK – exciting territory for learning’. They highlighted award-winning resources freely available for young people’s learning about drought and water scarcity in STEM and beyond.
 
 

Thursday 27 May

Making a difference: what can we do as individuals and what projects can students get involved in

​Twilight Talk
Andy Prentice, the author of a new children’s book Climate Crisis for Beginners (Usborne), was in conversation with Dr Ajay Gambhir from The Grantham Institute for Climate Change, at Imperial College London. Dr Gambhir acted as one of the expert consultants on the book. They discussed the science behind climate change and how to communicate this to children, as well as taking questions from the audience.
 
 
Twilight Forum
We heard from the Royal Society’s Schools Engagement team about their Tomorrow’s climate scientists programme and how it can support teachers and students. Some of the teachers involved in the programme already shared their experience and classroom activity case studies. The team also explained how you too can get involved and receive your own funding to run projects in school.

 

 
 
 

See more about the fantastic line-up of speakers and sessions

 

The discussion continues in the Primary STEM and 11-19 Science groups in the STEM Community. Review the discussion on Twitter by viewing #CCteacherconf

 

*Climate Change Educational Partnership (CCEP) members include:
Association for Science and Discovery Centres ~ Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy ~ Environment Agency ~ European Space Agency ~ MetOffice ~ Natural Environment Research Council ~ Royal Geographical Society ~ Royal Meteorological Society ~ Royal Society ~ STEM Learning ~ UK Space Agency ~ UK Research and Innovation