Results for "problem solving" (97)

Making mathematics real

I remember a very energetic mathematics advisor jumping across an imaginary place value chart, demonstrating a physical way to help children learn about place value and multiplying and dividing by 10 and 100. Physically moving around is a great way to learn and adds to the multi-sensory approach used to encompass the variety of learning styles within a...

Humanitarian engineering - engineering that makes a difference

What do engineers do?When you ask young people this question the kind of response you may get is “they fix things”, or “they build machines in factories that make things”. What many young people don’t know is that engineers are working to make life better for people in the developing world, including helping them coping with disasters such as earthquakes...

What do you need to succeed as a non-specialist teacher of mathematics?

Teacher recruitment has been, and remains, a popular topic in education news. The number of applications to enter the teaching profession fell from 19,330 in 2016 to 12,820 in 2017- a drop of 33%.What does that mean for schools and, in particular, for mathematics departments? Will there be fewer qualified mathematics teachers in the classroom?Government...

Core Maths: the story so far

In the 2017 Autumn Budget, the Government announced that schools and colleges will get £600 for every extra student who studies mathematics post-16.The advanced maths premium applies to all level three maths provision. So as well as funding for additional students studying AS and A level mathematics, further mathematics and statistics, the premium also...

The Amazing D30

A material with a split personality, combining Textile, Product Design and Engineering!D30 is runny, like orange slime, when it’s moving slowly. But if you hit it with a hammer it’s as hard as metal. Wow!Helmets, motorcycle jackets, footwear, phone cases, clothing for stunt actors, and even boxing gloves can all be made using D30. You can see some amazing...

How can we develop pupils’ explanations in mathematics?

In my 12 year old son’s eyes I am a failing parent. Why? Because, despite spending many hours standing on the side of a football pitch, I still can’t explain the offside rule. I’ve had it explained to me on many an occasion, even once with the use of Lego figures for concrete modelling, but I still just don’t get it, let alone apply my understanding during...

Why improving gender diversity in STEM should be a priority

Currently, the UK has the lowest proportion of women in engineering of any European country, with females accounting for just 10% of roles and 14% of engineering university places.As part of this small cohort of female engineers, it seems as if thousands of skilled, innovative and talented women aren’t even considering engineering as a career. This should...

Bringing engineering into the primary classroom

There is definitely a buzz around Rode Heath at the moment and I can’t help feel that it has something to do with our engineering project…One of the most important ways of engaging children in their learning, is to make it fun and purposeful. At Rode Heath, we are achieving that through our Think Like an Engineer way of learning!Back in October, with...

Inspiring tomorrow's engineers today

Who are tomorrow's engineers? I'd argue that every single student in your classroom could be an engineer.Typically, if you ask someone what an 'engineer' is they will reply with one or more of the following descriptors: introverted, nerdy, clever, fixes things, problem solver, dirty, mechanic, overalls, hard hat. And they work on cars, planes, trains and...

Making estimates about space

Do astronauts cut their hair in space? Recently, I’ve been exploring space in my mathematics classroom. The new curriculum requires students to study mathematics in an unfamiliar context, and the setting of space can provide an engaging way of covering familiar mathematical ideas.Additionally, the new GCSEs in science and design and technology include an...

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