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Mission: Starlight

This resource, from the Royal Society of Chemistry,  is about protecting astronauts from the effects of harmful UV light.

 

Students can experiment with different materials to discover which blocks UV light the best and can...

Surveying populations

This animation demonstrates the range of methods that can be used to investigate different populations in a woodland ecosystem.

The involvement of cells in hearing

This animation shows how cells enable us to hear.

How IAA, the most common form of auxin, works

This animation explores the action of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most common form of auxin, and looks at how scientists used experimental evidence to explain the role of auxins in a phototrophic response.

Do we favour fatty foods?

Watch our short film, in which we conduct a curry-tasting experiment, and then use the data generated to test whether the findings are statistically significant

Mission to Mars

In this DIY Faraday Challenge, students are asked to work in teams to design and construct the rocket which will transport supplies via Earth orbit to the astronauts on Mars. They are also required to build a system to transport the rocket to the launch site. Students must also show high manufacturing quality...

Studying Engineering at university

 This Tomorrow’s Engineers booklet, for students aged 16 to 19, explains the benefits of choosing a degree in engineering and helps with the decision-making process around courses and disciplines. Engineering skills are in high demand, so for students looking for a creative and practical job that makes a difference...

10 great reasons to become a scientist or engineer

A colourful display poster to inspire young learners to consider the exciting and meaningful careers available in science, technology, engineering and maths.

Make a difference, travel the world, invent something important, earn great money, solve the world’s biggest challenges, gain respect and do something...

A guide to vocational and apprenticeship routes into engineering

There are different routes into engineering, including apprenticeships, university and vocational qualifications. Apprenticeships combine on-the-job training with studying for vocational qualifications, or even a degree at university. 

 This Tomorrow’s Engineers booklet, aimed at 14 to 19-year-olds, answers...

Make a difference - be an engineer

This interactive presentation from Tomorrow’s Engineers introduces 11-14-year olds to engineering, inspiring them to think about a career in this sector. Developed in collaboration with the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Institute of Physics, Institution of Civil Engineers and the Institution of Engineering...

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