Oceans 11-19

This is a list of resources specifically selected to support the Polar Explorer Programme.

Links and Resources

Measuring the Oceans

This Cape Farewell video clip explains that scientists use satellite images and optical measurements to detect phytoplankton in the oceans and that they use various methods to capture their samples. Scientists are shown looking at some of the plankton samples they have captured.

Activity E - Collecting and checking is based on the video clip. Activity F - Plankton blooms is an extended investigation using chlorella – a type of algae. The density of the algae can be measured using a home-made Secchi disc (a small version of what is shown on the video). The presentation Colours can be used to explain how the Secchi disc works.

publication year
2010 to 2019

3 files

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Mapping the Sea *suitable for home teaching*

This film, from Twig World, looks at how the oceans can be mapped. Charting the waters around the Scottish island of Orkney was a pivotal moment in maritime mapping. But a reliance on outdated maps places modern ships in danger.

publication year
2010 to 2019

7 files

0

5

The Longitude Problem

This film, from Twig World, looks at the relationship between time and place. In an age before satellite navigation and GPS, one man found an ingenious solution to the problem of determining a ship's location at sea.

The key points made in the film are:

•Lines of latitude circle the Earth horizontally; lines of longitude run vertically from pole to pole.
•Calculating your latitude and longitude gives you your position in the world.
•Sailors use latitude and longitude to calculate their position at sea.
•John Harrison built an accurate portable clock, called a chronometer, to allow accurate naval navigation.

publication year
2010 to 2019

8 files

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Taking a Risk

This resource is designed to use and apply the uncertain and difficult nature of probability calculations in the real world through the work of an actuarial trainee. Students are provided with data on sea piracy, and use this to calculate the annual cost of piracy to the shipping industry, the probability of piracy for a particular company, and recommend to an insurance company the annual premium they should charge the company as protection from losses incurred due to piracy.

The activity is best conducted in groups or pairs as the data and ideas need considerable discussion to help students make decisions on the way of proceeding.

publication year
2000 - 2009

1 file

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Plastics in the Oceans and Tracking Satellites

Scientists recently found plastics floating in some of the most remote and inaccessible seas in the world, just off the coast of Antarctica.

Although it clearly looks ugly in such a pristine environment, scientists are more concerned about the major role plastics play in moving alien species around the world.

In this podcast, Richard Hollingham goes to the north Norfolk coast to speak to an expert on ocean plastics from the British Antarctic Survey to find out more.

publication year
2010 to 2019

1 file

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2

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