School Briefings: Body Image

This set of four Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) school briefings look at how body image, confidence and self-esteem are affected by advertising, social stigma and class. The briefings describe ESRC-funded research on each topic and can be used to spark discussions in the classroom about how people are affected, consciously and subconsciously, by the messages they hear.

The briefings cover:
* What is healthy? What is beautiful?
* Do models need to be thin to sell moisturiser?
* Fat is not a four-letter word
* This sporting life (and questions to think about)

Resources

What Is Healthy? What Is Beautiful?

This Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) school briefing discusses fat as a class issue, as well as a feminist issue. Research shows that middle class families are more likely to be health-conscious eaters, and chances are the shops in their neighbourhoods offer a wider range of healthy food. The resource...
Publication date:
2000 - 2009

1 file

0

0
Not yet rated

Do Models Need to Be Thin to Sell Moisturiser?

This Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) school briefing looks at the effectiveness of advertising and whether it really is necessary for advertisers to use very thin models to sell their products. Counter to this view, research shows that women are just as likely to buy a product if the model is of...
Publication date:
2000 - 2009

1 file

0

0
Not yet rated

Fat is Not a Four-letter Word

This Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) school briefing looks at how obesity is viewed by the general public and how the war on obesity could lead to discrimination on the grounds of a person's size and intolerance towards the over-weight. The briefing examines the possibly doubtful science that can colour...
Publication date:
2000 - 2009

1 file

0

0
Not yet rated

This Sporting Life - and Questions to Think About

This Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) school briefing looks at how middle class people take the need to exercise more personally than others. Although the need for exercise is generally recognised, research shows that more highly educated people are more likely to participate in regular exercise. The...
Publication date:
2000 - 2009

1 file

0

0
Not yet rated

Published by

Actions

Share this resource

Collections

This resource is part of Research Councils UK

Comments

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments