Born to engineer: real contexts for your scheme of work

In response to the shortage of trained engineers, the ERA Foundation launched the Born to Engineer campaign, which aims to inspire young people to become the engineers of the future.

At the heart of the campaign is a series of high quality short films, each featuring an engineer with an inspiring story.

These insightful films are available on our online resource collection. We have added teaching materials to some of these films to create engaging lesson ideas and activities.

Cancer and biomedical engineering

Eleanor Stride is developing a treatment for cancer that encloses cancer treating drugs in bubbles that can be directed by magnetic fields to the cancer site before releasing the drug using ultrasound. The associated resources look at cancer and drug development.

Electricity

Students look at fluctuations in electricity sources by analysing large data sets. The lesson is introduced with the video of Faye Banks who works for the National Grid. Since growing up in care and returning to education to retake her GCSEs while working at a packing plant, she has become Young Women Engineer of the Year 2004.

Fire extinguishers and combustion

A predict-observe-explain activity, where students explore different ways of extinguishing a flame with some surprising results.

Making stars: fusion

Kim Cave-Ayland is working to create a safe, low-pollution power source that could change the world forever. Activities on nuclear fusion, binding energy, radioactivity and the hot CNO cycle in stars, suitable for students aged 16-19, are included.

Antibubbles

This lesson links aspects of states of matter to the use of bubbles to deliver drugs to cancerous tissue. A great activity which explores states of matter in a novel situation. 

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