Inspiring scientists

Inspiring Scientists is a series of resources to help develop students’ understanding and awareness of science and the diversity of scientists. The resources showcase the life stories of British scientists with minority ethnic heritage and covers issues such as being a minority in science, influences in their childhoods and the fun and importance of science both to themselves and to the wider community. The activities that accompany the profiles relate to the area of research that the scientist is involved in. The resources for each scientist are divided into two academic levels: primary and secondary (age 11-16). Each resource consists of teacher guidance, an activity worksheet, the scientist’s timeline and a video profile. The video profiles were commissioned by the Royal Society and carried out as an oral history project by National Life Stories at the British Library. Interviewees range from PhD students to Professors and the focus on science is wide, covering academia, big industry and individual entrepreneurship with scientists working across a range of scientific disciplines from food science to space science.

Resources

Donald Palmer

Donald Palmer's job involves studying, and teaching others how, the human body protects itself from infections and malfunctions, including cancer. He is especially interested in the way the immune system changes with age, and examines the surfaces of human cells using chemicals and instruments.As a child born and...
Publication date:
2010 to date

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Jassel Majevadia

Jassel Majevadia is currently completing a PhD which will contribute to the safety of nuclear energy. Working on her Mac in coffee shops at Imperial College, she is able to apply her knowledge of mathematics and physics to perform new calculations and improve understanding of the way in which tiny bits of materials...
Publication date:
2010 to date

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Jo Shien Ng

Jo Shien Ng works to develop more and more sensitive electrical components called 'avalanche photodiodes' used in everything from satellites that look at the Earth from space, to body scanners in hospitals and airports. She does this by applying an understanding of the behaviour of materials developed through...
Publication date:
2010 to date

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Maggie Aderin-Pocock

You may have seen Maggie Aderin-Pocock presenting BBC's The Sky at Night, asking Jeremy Paxman to hold a torch while she described a lunar eclipse, or on the sofa of a breakfast television show or The One Show talking enthusiastically about science. You may not know that she has hung out of the back of military...
Publication date:
2010 to date

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