Astro Pi

Leading UK space organisations have joined forces with British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake and Raspberry Pi to offer students a chance to devise and code their own apps or experiment to run in space.

Two Raspberry Pi computers are planned to be flown to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of Tim’s six month mission and both will be connected to a new “Astro Pi” board, loaded with a host of sensors and gadgets.

This collection of teacher guides and resources, for primary and secondary schools and beyond, assists the teaching of background knowledge that will help entrants to be creative and solve real-world problems. The lesson plans can also be used outside of the AstroPi competition to enhance the teaching of space and related topics.

This resource supports the Astro-Pi competition. 

Resources

The World's Biggest Shadow

This teacher resource, part of the AstroPi project with UK Space Agency and Raspberry Pi Foundation, investigates sunlight and shadows in a space context. It is suitable for children in primary school.The sequence of activities is linked to other resources in the eLibrary, starting from basic ideas about light and...
Publication date:
2010 to date

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Magnetic Earth

This AstroPi resource helps secondary school students investigate the magnetic field of the Earth. The series of activities develops from basic principles of magnetism through to some understanding of the nature and cause of the Earth's magnetism.The guide links to several other eLibrary resources and a bespoke...
Publication date:
2010 to date

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Build the Station Simulation

With just a few materials, building a paper model of the International Space Station (ISS) can become a class project. This publication contains a brief overview of the ISS, its parts, the science that occurs on board, instructions, and extension fact sheets. Learn about the ISS, explore fun facts, simulate building...
Publication date:
2010 to date

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Stay Sharp

This cross-curricular resource for primary schools looks at reaction-time for astronauts and distances travelled by the International Space Station in that time.Children learn about the body and how nerves allow us to respond to events. They develop systems for measuring reaction times using everyday equipment and...
Publication date:
2010 to date

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Subject(s)Computing, Science, Earth science, Physics, Practical work, Outside the classroom
Tagsn.a
Age5-7, 7-11, 11-14, 14-16, 16-19
Published2010 to date
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URLhttps://www.stem.org.uk/cx65e
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