Satellites, Launchers and Landers

A great deal of space exploration is performed by autonomous craft. They have mapped remote planets and even landed to send surface data back to Earth. Satellites have changed the world of communication, earth observation and, through global positioning systems, everyday navigation. This collection, with contributors such as ESA and NASA, looks at satellites, remote exploration and also the launchers that get them into space.

Resources

Rocket Images and Video

NASA's Space Shuttle may be a well-known launch vehicle, but the majority of launches still take place using rockets. These regularly carry satellites into orbit. These materials show images of rockets, such as the Saturn V which powered the Apollo missions and current Delta and Atlas rockets. There is also a...

Rockets and Projectiles

This booklet is part of the ‘Innovations in Practical Work’ series published by the Gatsby Science Enhancement Programme (SEP). Studying rockets captures the imagination of many students, as well as providing real-life applications of Newton’s laws of motion.

The booklet looks at the differences between...

Is There Anybody Out There?

A Catalyst article about the Kepler spacecraft, which is used to look for extra-solar planets. Scientists are hoping to shine light on the age old question of life’s existence elsewhere in the Universe using a new space-based telescope named Kepler. Launched on 6 March 2009, Kepler is searching the sky for small,...

Designs on Space: the Lifecycle of a Satellite

A Catalyst article about designing, building and testing a spacecraft. There are thousands of man-made satellites orbiting the Earth. Some are only a few hundred kilometres above the Earth and complete one orbit roughly every 90 minutes. Geostationary satellites are located around 40 000 kilometres from the surface...

Pages

Published by

Actions

Share this resource